Travel, but travel with responsibility

A journey along Panama. Update: Videos

– Click zur deutschen Version –

stepmap-karte-panama-1519954-2

Panama is an inspiring country – everywhere you go you´ll find something unexpected. Hidden beaches, a pirate fortress, wild animals, very helpful and nice people and much more. With this post, I´ll share some of my moments in Panama with you. The journey begins in Panama City, afterwards I continued to Portobelo, later my way led me to the highlands, the villages El Copé and Boquete, and last but not least the island Boca Brava before I continued via the city David to Costa Rica.

DSC00565

Panama City

I have arrived to Panama at night. Before I travelled, I have arranged a couchsurfing place, but unfortunately the woman who was supposed to host me and pick me up was not very reliable – so I ended up standing at the airport at night, without any idea where to go and what to do. I haven´t inform myself in advance about hostels and safe areas in the city – that´s what I´ve learned for the next time! You need to always have a “Plan B”. Luckily I met two German guys who rented a car. They offered me to take me with them to the city center (the airport is about 40 minutes away from the city and moreover not a very safe area) and drop me at a hotel or something like that. Better than nothing! They drove me to the next hotel we found on the way, which was unfortunately not into my price range. But they had at least internet and I searched for hostels in the city.

DSC00189

Panama City Skyline

Coincidentally a friend of mine was also at the same time in Panama City and he wrote me some days ago in which hostel he stayed. By taxi I went to this hostel, which is called “Mamallena”, located in the neighborhood Perejil. I arrived very tired and jet-lagged after an around 26-hours journey – luckily they had some free beds in the dorm. 13 US-Dollars per night with a pancake and coffee breakfast. I slept well but the next day I woke up very early in the morning due to my jetlag.

DSC00198

I didn´t plan to stay a long time in Panama City – I do not like the  big cities too much. They are loud, stressy, dirty and sometimes dangerous. It´s generally more relaxed and safer in the areas further away from big cities. People are friendlier, the pace is slower and you should not be feared to get robbed.

Harbour

Harbour

Nevertheless, since I was already in Panama City, I wanted to see the most interesting spots. They were undoubtedly the promenade from where you can see perfectly the huge “US-like” skyline and the old city center (Casco viejo). Both was well reachable by walk from Perejil, where the hostel is located. On the way we (Hannes from Italy, who I met at the hostel) passed by an accident where one person died. Police, ambulance, press – all were present. We just wanted to let this scene behind us – an indication for the dangerous traffic here.

Casco Viejo

Casco Viejo

The skyline we saw was impressive, some buildings very high and even some of them with a nice architecture. The old city center was also very impressive and some buildings renewed and very beautiful. Other buildings almost rotten but I guess they cannot be completely removed because the Casco Viejo is a declared World Heritage site. We were walking along streets, which is more or less safe during day – but you should not do that during night, at least not into dark side streets.

Casco Viejo

Casco Viejo

Casco Viejo

Casco Viejo

Casco Viejo

Casco Viejo

Later, my friend and me went to the Panama Canal, because we thought it should be a nice attraction – and if you are in Panama, you should visit the Panama canal. But when we arrived there (by taxi) we were disappointed. In order to see the ships in the canal very close, you have to pay 15 US-Dollars. At the site is also a documentation offered and a guide, but we didn´t want to pay 15 Dollars to see that. So we asked locals if there is another possibility to see the ships and they recommended us to drive to Puerto Miguel. So we took another taxi in order to get there. It was not very spectacular but at least we saw the big ships crossing the canal. In the end we payed about 23 Dollars for the taxi and it was not really worth it. The most interesting thing of that trip was the crocodile sitting in a branch of the Panama canal :)

DSC00240

Exotic fruit at the promenade

Exotic fruit at the promenade

Ship entering the Panama Canal

Ship entering the Panama Canal

In Perejil it´s not a problem to walk along streets at night, but in other parts it´s not recommended.

Portobelo

The next day I already wanted to leave Panama City. Thomas, another friend from Germany, was also coincidentally travelling in Panama and we were now traveling for about 10 days together. We were not sure, to where we wanted to continue our journey but finally we took the decision – Portobelo. First we had to drive by local bus to Colón (3 $) and change the bus to Portobelo (2$). Colón is a very poor and neglected city – that´s why there is a lot of crime happening. Even during day at principal streets. Some travellers even try to avoid Colón completely. My hint is to just stay at the terminal for changing the bus, there it is more or less safe. Don´t walk around in the city – especially not with your luggage. If you really want to see the poverty, which is present everywhere, take an official cab and lock the doors from inside.

Once we left Colón to Portobelo the landscape along the street became more and more beautiful. We drove along a coastal street, through palm forests and above tropical rivers coming from the hilly area behind the coast. Some nice houses now and then were located along the coast.

Portobelo Fortress

Portobelo Fortress

When we reached Portobelo, we were looking for an accommodation and quite fast we found one (it´s called Hospendaje Sangui) – there are not too many options here. We payed just 8 $ per Person without wifi but with a kitchen. From Portobelo, many people set off by sailing ship to the islands of San Blas or Colombia, but it´s really expensive.

DSC00256

We were walking around and found a big pirate fortress with cannons. It looked magic in combination with the sea, the palm trees, the landscape and the ships in the bay.

Portobelo sunset

Sunset at the bay

IMG_9148

Portobelo

Portobelo

DSC00261

DSC00322

Village house

DSC00317

festival took place during the days that we stayed here. It was like a fair with little roller coasters, but also a Cumbia dancing presentation etc. It was very interesting but the music was really loud – almost the whole time, also during night. The motto here is: the louder, the better – and the bone shaking bass cannot be missed.

The weather during our stay was generally hot, humid, sunny and sometimes with some clouds and a light wind. But during one night it was raining very heavily. The weather at the caribbean side is quite unstable and unpredictable. So if you are sleeping here in a hammock outside, you could get a unwelcome surprise :)

Portobelo does not offer a beach directly on the side of the village. If you want to reach beautiful beaches you can take a little boat and the driver will drop you at some beaches on the other side of the bay. But this costs between 10 and 15 $ per person. If you want to avoid that, you could take the local bus for around 30 minutes. The beautiful beach with caribbean flair and without many people between Portobelo and Colón is called Playa Angosta. Here we relaxed a bit, enjoyed the warm and flat water and one random guy there gave us some cold beer. I like Panama! :)

DSC00284

DSC00294

Behind the beach

Behind the beach

El Copé

From Portobelo we drove back to Colón for 2 $ and from there to Panama City for another 3 $. In total not more than 3 hours. At the terminal in Panama City we bought a bus ticket to Penonomé for 5 $. The journey took about 2 hours. From there to Copé by minibus for 2,5 $ and 30 minutes. And finally we reached the little village in the highlands of Panama where mass tourism has luckily not arrived yet.

DSC00340

The climate was a bit fresher than in the lowland and coastal area but still warm during the day – at night even a bit cold.

People were watching us curiously and they were friendly and helpful. One family even offered us something to eat – but since I´m not eating meat I had to reject the offer. People here hardly understand, that somebody is not eating meat. For them it´s a big part of the culture to eat meat.

There are not many options for accommodation and very fast we found “Hostal Buena Esperanza”.  12 $ per person, breakfast included. The hosts were very friendly and the woman even washed our clothes for free and prepared something to eat for us with the things that we bought at the supermarket. The atmosphere was very familiar and we were the only guests.

If you want to eat here something between 1 pm and 7 pm you are forced to buy and cook by yourself (or let it cook), because restaurants are very rare and usually just open for breakfast and for dinner, after 7 pm.

I guess the people in Panama like to celebrate – here was also a loud festival taking place during the days of our stay 😉 So the party music together with the noises of the animals around us (chicken, dogs, parrots, etc.) were creating our “fall-asleep-background-jingle”.

In the jungle

In the jungle

I got used to make yoga almost every day after or before breakfast. It´s a very nice start of the day :) Later we went to the national park Omar Torrijos. First we took a taxi to Barrigón for 3 $ and from there we walked along the street higher and higher (the whole way from Barrigón to the entrance counts around 4 km) until some guys from a community in the national park took us the last third of the way by their pickup car and dropped us in front of the ranger office of the national park. Of course, you can also take a taxi until the park entrance! A local minibus also brings you to Barrigón but only once an hour.

Jungle impressions

Jungle impressions

The landscape here is very beautiful but nevetheless the park not highly visited. We payed 3 $ entrance student price and walked along the steep and slippy trails, which were sometimes even not really visible. A very beautiful experience to walk in the middle of the highland rain forest. But take care and be aware of every step you take because you can easily slip and fall off the path.

Suddenly, a very skinny little dog came into our way. He looked very weak and seriously almost dead. We fed him some of our food and forced him to continue with us to the ranger station, where I hoped he will get some help. The dog was very often afraid to climb up or down steep parts of the path and he was also afraid of crossing rivers. So we had to carry him from time to time.

DSC00367

When we reached the ranger station, the woman there told us, that the dog belongs probably to the community in the jungle and just got lost. She kept him at the ranger station and promised us to take care of him.

DSC00378

DSC00387

IMG_9190

Ants carrying parts of leafs

Ants carrying parts of leafs

DSC00403

DSC00407

DSC00414

DSC00412

Boquete

From El Copé by minibus to Penonomé and from there by big and comfortable bus to David. For the big bus we payed 11 $ and we drove around 4 hours. We realised that almost the whole Panamericana is a work in progress. From David we drove around 1 hour upwards again towards the highlands for 2 $.

Work in progress

Work in progress

Thomas knew already the hostel “Palacio” and we checked-in there for 11 $ per night for a dorm. It´s just located on the other side of the bus station and the village park. The hosts are very friendly and gave us a warm welcome. There is a nice garden for relaxing or making yoga :), wifi and a kitchen. I felt very comfortable.

Hostel garden

Hostel garden

Since Boquete is a bit more touristic, there are special shops with western products (e.g. Deli Barú). In one Bio-shop we bought a big package of cereals for preparing every morning muesli with fruits :) Fruits and vegetables from the small shops are very delicious and cheap.

The climate here is a bit colder than in El Copé but comfortable during day and during night you´ll need a light pullover.

You can do here plenty of activities. There are waterfall trails, the volcano Barú, hot springs or the “Sendero Los Quetzales”, which is a hiking trail trough the jungle from Bajo Mono to Cerro Punta, from about 1000 to 2000 meter above sealevel. I decided to walk this trail! First you need to take a bus from Boquete to Bajo Mono (2$), from there you can already start to walk, but some travellers prefer to drive directly to the ranger house, where the trail “officially” starts. Just ask a minibus or taxi driver, they know.

DSC00433

The views were already here stunning and I was really lucky with the weather!

DSC00436

On the way to the trail

DSC00465

Boquete Jungle

DSC00490

On the way up I met two guys from Canada and one from Israel and was walking with them for a while. After 3 hours or so they wanted to turn back to Bajo Mono and to the village Boquete, because it became quite hard for them to continue hiking. Seriously, it was a bit exhausting and the high humidity in the jungle didn´t improve the situation – but it was a really great hike for those, who have already a bit experience with hiking! First the tropical rain forest dominated and the higher I came, the more changed the vegetation and the climate became a bit drier and more subtropical.

Boquete Sendero Quetzal

DSC00510

I continued my way alone and immediately met two other guys from Canada. Both quite freaky globetrotter-hippies (or something like that ;), one was playing a guitar on the way and the other one a kind of a melodica. It was fun to get some nice music on the way and actually kind of crazy :)

DSC00518 When we reached the ranger house at the end of the trail we were completely wasted but proud that we did it! There was also a nice garden around with many flowers, pasture, hummingbirds, lizards, etc. and a bank and table for taking a rest. Later we were walking downwards in village direction, along agricultural fields and more stunning views. On the way, a pick-up crossed our way and took us to the next bus station, where the bus to David came quite fast. I drove to David (about 2 hours) and then 1 hour again up to Boquete. It was a very nice day and I reached the hostel when it was already dark!

DSC00515

End of the trail

DSC00519

Ranger house

DSC00523

DSC00525

Landscape around village Cerro Punta

DSC00529

Hitchhiking to the Bus Station

Boca Brava

By bus back to David and from there by minibus to Boca Chica and by taxi boat to the island Boca Brava. The whole journey costs around 8 $.

DSC00553

Harbour of Boca Chica

What you should in any case take into account when you want to travel to Boca Brava, take enough money and food with you – plan a bit how long you want to stay on the island more or less, because there is no shop, neither a restaurant (only an expensive hotel restaurant ) nor an ATM.

DSC00564

Island view

There are 3 option for accommodation on the island, an expensive one and two hostels which offer  tipi tents, cabinas or an area for camping if you bring your own tent (prices from around 5 to 30 $). We decided to stay in Hostel HowlersBay :)

DSC00569

Way to the beach

DSC00625

What you can do here is going to the beach (there are 2 two of them) or just relax in a hammock at the hostel and forget about unimportant things!

There is a nice view from the veranda of the hostel to the ocean and other little islands! Very beautiful and perfect for making Yoga.

Boca brava

Fantastic view

DSC00601

Hammock time

The veranda

The veranda

DSC00613

IMG_9295

 

IMG_9303

Monkeys everywhere

With Thomas at the veranda

With Thomas at the veranda

playa christina boca brava

Playa Christina

From Panama crossing the boarder to Costa Rica

It´s quite easy; there are frequent local buses from David to the boarder. There you have to walk a bit, get a stamp from the Panama side that you are leaving the country and a stamp from the Costa Rican side, that you are entering the country. Sometimes they may ask you for a return or continuation ticket to another country. Also bus tickets out of the country are usually accepted.

The whole procedure can take longer or shorter, depends on the amount of people travelling! In our case the procedure was quite fast.

General Safety Hints

Generally it is safe to travel in Panama, also for a woman who is traveling alone. That was at least my impression. Only once I felt a bit annoyed by a guy who was sitting behind me in a bus and has asked me many things about me and why I´m traveling alone since I´m so young.

There are some common sense things, that you should always take into account.

– don´t walk alone at night (and in some city areas during day, e.g. Panama City, Colón) along dark and isolated streets or beaches

– leave your expensive and obvious jewellery at home

– do not wear very short clothes (miniskirts, etc.), especially while traveling by bus

– keep your belongings in sight (while traveling)

– allocate your articles of value to different places in your bag(s) and body (belt, body bags, etc.)

Thanks for reading!

-Sarita

! Book Tip: A great book that accompanied me along my journey through Panama and that really inspired me is: Siddhartha from Hermann Hesse ! It truly enriched my life and it changed my way of thinking.

 

Deutsche Version

Oh wie schön ist Panama! – Eine Reise entlang Panama –

stepmap-karte-panama-1519954-2

Panama ist ein inspirierendes Land – überall wo du hingehst entdeckst du etwas Unerwartetes. Versteckte Strände, eine alte Piratenfestung, wilde Tiere, nette und hilfsbereite Menschen und noch viel mehr. Mit diesem Beitrag möchte ich einige meiner Momente in Panama mit dir teilen. Die Reise beginnt in Panama City, danach bin ich weiter nach Portobelo gereist, später hat mich mein Weg ins Hochland gebracht, nach El Copé und Boquete und “last but not least” zur Insel Boca Brava, bevor ich über David nach Costa Rica gereist bin.

DSC00565

Panama City

Ich bin in Panama bei Nacht angekommen. Bevor ich meine Reise angetreten habe, habe ich noch  einen Platz bei einer Couchsurferin arrangiert, aber leider war diese nicht sehr zuverlässig und ist nicht erschienen wie abgemacht, um mich abzuholen. Auch als ich sie anrufen wollte, hat keiner abgenommen. Also bin ich am Flughafen gestanden ohne eine Idee zu haben wohin ich gehen sollte und was ich tun soll. Ich habe mich nicht über Hostels und sichere Gegenden in Panama City informiert – das habe ich für zukünftige Reisen gelernt! Habe immer einen “Plan B” bereit. Glücklicherweise habe ich zwei Deutsche getroffen, die im gleichen Flieger saßen wie ich. Diese haben einen Mietwagen arrangiert und mir angeboten mich mit in die City zu nehmen (diese ist ca. 40 Minuten vom Flughafen und der unsicheren Gegen drumherum entfernt) und mich beim nächsten Hotel rauszulassen. Besser als nichts! Also wurde ich bei einem Hotel abgesetzt, welches leider nicht in meinem Preisbereich lag. Zum Glück konnte ich aber das Internet benutzen, um nach günstigen Hostels zu suchen.

DSC00189

Panama City Skyline

Zufälligerweise war ein Freund von mir auch gerade in Panama City und hat mir geschrieben, dass er im “Hostel Mamallena” im Viertel Perejil ist. Also habe ich mir ein Taxi genommen und bin dort hin gefahren. Der Taxifahrer wusste schon wo das ist. Ich bin sehr müde und jet-lagged nach einer ca. 26-stündigen Reise angekommen – glücklicherweise gab es noch ein freies Bett im Dorm. 13 $ pro Nacht mit einen Pancake und Kaffee Frühstück. Ich habe gut geschlafen, aber am nächsten Morgen bin ich wegen des Jetlags sehr früh aufgewacht.

DSC00198

Ich wollte nicht so lange in Panama City bleiben – ich mag die großen Städte nicht sehr. Diese sind laut, stressig, dreckig und manchmal auch gefährlich. Generell ist es entspannter und sicherer in den ländlichen Gegenden. Die Leute sind viel freundlicher, alles läuft langsamer ab und man braucht sich nicht so viele Gedanken darüber zu machen ausgeraubt zu werden.

Harbour

Fischer-Hafen

Doch da ich schon hier war wollte ich natürlich auch die interessantesten Spots sehen. Diese sind ohne Zweifel die Promenade, von der man die gigantische USA-ähnliche Skyline sieht, und das alte Stadtzentrum (Casco Viejo). Beides war von Perejil gut zu Fuß erreichbar. Auf dem Weg (ich war mit Hannes von Italien, den ich im Hostel getroffen hatte, unterwegs) sind wir an einem Unfall vorbei gekommen, bei der eine Person ums Leben kam. Polizei, Krankenwagen, Presse – alle waren vertreten. Wir wollten diesem Szenario einfach entkommen – ein Indikator für den gefährlichen Verkehr hier in Panama City.

Casco Viejo

Casco Viejo

Die Skyline von Panama City ist beeindruckend; manche Gebäude sind unglaublich hoch und manche von ihnen weisen sogar eine interessante Architektur auf. Das alte Stadtzentrum war auch beeindruckend und entspricht mehr meinem Geschmack. Viele Kolonial-Gebäude wurden renoviert und waren sehr schön. An anderen wurde gar nichts gemacht und diese sind darum schon fast verrotet. Aber ich nehme an, dass diese nicht abgerissen werden dürfen, da Casco Viejo ein erklärtes Weltkulturerbe der UNESCO ist.

Wir sind durch die Straßen geschlendert, welche mehr oder weniger sicher während des Tages sind – aber du solltest das nicht bei Nacht tun, zumindest natürlich nicht in dunklen Seitenstraßen.

Casco Viejo

Casco Viejo

Casco Viejo

Casco Viejo

Casco Viejo

Casco Viejo

Später bin ich mit Adrian, einem Freund aus Deutschland, zum Panama-Kanal gefahren, da wir dachten, dass es interessant ist, sich das einmal von Näherem anzuschauen – und wenn man schon einmal in Panama ist, dann MUSS man sich das auch anschauen, oder? Jedenfalls, als wir mit dem Taxi ankamen wurden wir enttäuscht. Wir hätten 15 $ Eintritt zahlen müssen, um die Schiffe von Nahem zu sehen – eine Dokumentation und ein Guide, der alles erklärt, wären auch dabei gewesen. Aber wir wollten das nicht bezahlen. Also haben wir Einheimische gefragt, von wo man denn die Schiffe sehen kann und nichts bezahlen muss. Diese haben uns daraufhin Puerto Miguel empfohlen. Also haben wir ein weiteres Taxi dorthin genommen. Es war nicht spektakulär aber zumindest haben wir gesehen, wie die großen Schiffe in den Kanal fahren. Am Ende haben wir zusammen 23 $ für das Taxi bezahlt und es war es nicht wirklich wert. Das interessanteste an diesem Trip war das Krokodil, das  sich in einem Seitenarm des Kanals gesonnt hat 😉

DSC00240

Exotic fruit at the promenade

Exotische Frucht an der Promenade

Ship entering the Panama Canal

Schiff beim Einfahren in den Panama Kanal

In Perejil (Stadtteil des Hostels) ist es kein Problem durch die Straßen zu laufen, auch bei Nacht. Aber in anderen Gegenden, wie Tocumen,  ist es nicht sehr empfehlenswert.

Portobelo

Am nächsten Tag wollte ich Panama City verlassen. Thomas, auch ein Freund aus Deutschland, ist auch gerade zufällig in Panama gereist und wir sind von nun an ca. 10 Tage zusammen gereist. Wir waren noch nicht ganz sicher, wohin wir weiterreisen wollten, aber letztendlichen haben wir die Entscheidung getroffen – Portobelo. Zuerst haben wir den lokalen Bus nach Colón genommen (3 $) und sind dort in den Bus nach Portobelo umgestiegen (2 $).

Colón ist eine sehr arme und vernachlässigte Stadt – hier herrscht eine hohe Kriminalitätsrate. Sogar am Tag an belebten Hauptstraßen. Manche Reisende versuchen sogar Colón auf ihrer Reise komplett zu meiden. Meine Empfehlung ist einfach am Bus-Terminal zu bleiben und vom einen in den anderen Bus umzusteigen. Dort ist es mehr oder weniger sicher. Laufe nicht in der Stadt herum – vor allem nicht mit deinem Gepäck. Wenn du wirklich Colón und die Armut ansehen möchtest, welche hier überall present ist, nehme ein offizielles Taxi und schließe die Türen von innen.

Nachdem wir Colón in Richtung Portobelo verlassen haben, ist die Landschaft immer schöner geworden. Wir sind an der Küste entlang gefahren, durch Palmwälder und über tropische Flüsse, die von der bergigen Landschaft hinter der Küste kommen. Hin und wieder sind wir auch an schönen Häusern vorbei gefahren.

Portobelo Fortress

Portobelo Piraten Festung

In Portobelo angekommen haben wir gleich nach einer Unterkunft Ausschau gehalten und schnell haben wir auch eine gefunden (Hospendaje Sangui) – es gibt hier nicht viele Optionen. Wir haben 8 $ pro Person gezahlt, ohne Wifi aber mit Küche. Von hier segeln viele Leute zu den San Blas Inseln oder Kolumbien, aber das ist ziemlich teuer.

DSC00256

Wir sind ein wenig umher gelaufen und auf eine große Piratenfestung mit Kanonen gestoßen. Es hat magisch ausgesehen, in Kombination mit dem Meer, den Palmen, der Landschaft und den Schiffen in der Bucht.

Portobelo sunset

Sonnenuntergang in der Bucht

IMG_9148

Portobelo

Portobelo

DSC00261

DSC00322

Village house

DSC00317

Ein Festival hat während der Tage, an denen wir hier verbracht haben statt gefunden. Es war wie ein Jahrmarkt mit einer kleinen Achterbahn usw. aber es gab auch eine Cumbia Tanzaufführung, die sehr interessant anzuschauen war, jedoch sehr laut – fast die ganze Zeit lief die Musik, auch während der Nacht. Das Motto hier ist: je lauter desto besser – und der Bass, der die Knochen vibrieren lässt, darf natürlich nicht fehlen.

Das Wetter während unseres Aufenthaltes war generell heiß, feucht und sonnig, manchmal mit einigen Wolken und einem leichten Wind. Das Wetter hier an der Karibik ist das ganze Jahr über heiß und feucht und relativ unbeständig. Während einer Nacht hat es sehr stark geregnet. Wenn du also draußen auf einer Hängematte schläfst, könntest du eine unwillkommene Überraschung erleben :)

Portobelo bietet keinen Strand auf der Seite des Dorfes. Jedoch kannst du dich mit einem kleinen Boot auf die andere Seite der Bucht befördern lassen, um an schöne Strände zu kommen. Das kostet jedoch 10 -15 $ pro Person. Wenn du das vermeiden möchtest kannst du auch den Bus für ca. 30 Minuten nehmen. Der schöne Strand mit dem karibischen Flair und ohne viele Leute zwischen Portobelo und Colon heißt Playa Angosta. Hier haben wir relaxt, das warme und flache Wasser genossen und ein Mann, der zufällig vorbei kam hat uns kaltes Bier geschenkt. Ich mag Panama! :)

DSC00284

Playa Angosta

DSC00294

Behind the beach

Hinter dem Strand

El Copé

Von Portobelo sind wir zurück nach Colon gefahren für 2 $, von dort nach Panama City für 3 $. Zusammen nicht mehr als 3 Stunden. Am Terminal von Panama City haben wir ein Busticket nach Penonomé gekauft für 5 $. Die Fahrt hat ca. 2 h gedauert. Von dort haben wir dann einen kleinen Bus nach Copé genommen und nochmal 2,5 $ für 30 Minuten bezahlt. Und letztendlich haben wir das kleine Dorf erreicht, im Hochland von Panama, wo der Massentourismus zum Glück noch nicht angekommen ist.

Das Klima hier war ein wenig kühler als an der Küste, aber immer noch sehr warm während dem Tag – bei Nacht recht frisch.

DSC00340

Landschaft um das Dorf

Leute haben uns neugierig angeschaut und sie waren freundlich und hilfsbereit. Eine Familie hat uns sogar angeboten bei ihnen zu essen – aber da ich kein Fleisch esse, musste ich das Angebot leider ausschlagen. Die Leute hier können kaum glauben, dass jemand kein Fleisch isst. Für sie ist das Fleisch Essen ein großer Teil der Kultur und Traditionen.

Es gibt nicht viele Möglichkeiten für eine Unterkunft. Ich glaube nur 2 Hostels. Sehr schnell haben wir so das Hostel “Buena Esperanza” gefunden. 12 $ pro Person mit Frühstück. Die Gastgeber waren sehr freundlich und die Frau hat sogar Wäsche kostenlos für uns mit gewaschen und hat uns etwas zu essen zubereitet, aus den Zutaten, die wir selbst im Supermarkt gekauft haben. Die Atmosphäre war sehr gemütlich und wir waren die einzigen Gäste.

Wenn du hier etwas zwischen 1 pm und 7 pm essen möchtest bist du gezwungen selbst zu kochen (oder kochen zu lassen), da Restaurants ziemlich rar sind und normalerweise nur für Frühstück und Abendessen öffnen.

Ich glaube, dass die Leute hier in Panama (generell Central- und Südamerika) sehr gerne feiern – hier gab es auch ein lautes Festival während wir im Dorf waren 😉 Die Party-Musik zusammen mit den Lauten der Tiere um uns herum (Hühner, Hunde, Papageien,…) haben unsere “Einschlaf-Musik” zusammen gestellt.

In the jungle

Im Dschungel

Ich habe mich hier daran gewöhnt fast jeden Tag vor oder nach dem Frühstück Yoga zu machen. Das ist ein sehr guter Start in den Tag :)

Jungle impressions

Jungle impressions

Etwas später am Morgen sind wir zum Nationalpark Omar Torrijos aufgebrochen. Zuerst haben wir ein Taxi nach Barrigón für 3 $ zusammen genommen und von dort sind wir die Straße entlang höher und höher hinauf gelaufen (die gesamte Strecke von Barrigón zum Eingang des National Parks sind ca. 4 Kilometer). Auf halber Strecke haben uns jedoch ein paar Einheimische, die dort oben in einer Kommune leben mit dem Pick-up mitgenommen und uns beim Ranger Haus des Nationalparks raus gelassen. Natürlich kann man auch ein Taxi bis ganz nach oben nehmen, bzw. besser ein 4×4 Fahrzeug. Ein lokaler Minibus bringt dich auch nach Barrigón, aber nur einmal die Stunde!

Die Landschaft hier ist sehr schön mit einer tollen Biodiversität, jedoch der Nationalpark nicht so sehr besucht, da er noch eher unbekannt ist. Wir haben 3 $ Eintritt gezahlt (Studentenpreis) und sind an steilen und glitschigen Pfaden, die nicht wirklich gut gekennzeichnet waren entlang gelaufen. Der Pfad war manchmal sogar gar nicht sichtbar und die Wanderung hat sich als Abenteuer heraus gestellt. Jedoch haben wir auch gleich die lange Route gewählt, die wohl eher weniger Besucher laufen. Nichtsdestotrotz war es eine sehr schöne Erfahrung in mitten des Hochland-Dschungels zu laufen. Aber sei vorsichtig und achte auf jeden Schritt, da du leicht ausrutschen und den steilen Abhang herunter fallen könntest!

DSC00367

Plötzlich, auf halber Strecke, ist uns ein abgemagerter Welpe entgegen gekommen. Er schaute schon sehr schwach aus und wirklich fast tot. Wir haben ihm ein wenig mit unserem Essen gefüttert und ihn gezwungen mit uns mit zu kommen bis zur Ranger Station. Alleine hätte er hier im Dschungel wohl nicht überlebt. Der Welpe hatte oft Angst an steilen Stellen des Pfades hoch oder herunter zu laufen und vor Flüssen hatte er auch Angst. Also mussten wir ihn von Zeit zu Zeit auch tragen. Am Ranger-Haus angekommen hat uns die Frau erklärt, dass der Hund wohl zur Kommune gehört, die oben im Dschungel lebt, und verloren gegangen ist. Sie hat ihn dort behalten und uns versprochen, dass sie für den Hund sorgen wird.

DSC00378

DSC00387

IMG_9190

Ants carrying parts of leafs

Ameisen, die Blatteile tragen

DSC00403

DSC00407

DSC00414

DSC00412

Boquete

Von El Copé mit dem Minibus nach Penonomé und von dort mit dem großen Bus nach David. Für den großen Bus haben wir 11 $ gezahlt und sind ca. 4 Stunden gefahren. Wir haben fest gestellt, dass fast die ganze Panamericana eine Baustelle ist. Die Straße wird ausgebaut und verbessert. Von David sind wir ca. 1 Stunde hoch gefahren, wieder ins Hochland, für ca. 2 $.

Work in progress

Baustelle auf der Panamericana

Thomas hat schon das Hostel “Palacio” gekannt, bei dem wir wieder eingecheckt sind für 11 $ pro Nacht im Dorm. Das Hostel ist gleich auf der anderen Seite der Bus-Station und des Dorf-Parkes gelegen. Die Gastgeber waren sehr freundlich und haben uns herzlichen willkommen geheißen. Es gibt einen schönen Garten, in dem es immer etwas neues zu entdecken gibt und Yoga kann man dort natürlich auch super praktizieren. Wifi und Küche waren auch dabei. Ich habe mich hier sehr wohl gefühlt.

Hostel garden

Hostel garden

Boquete ist etwas touristischer und es gibt spezielle Shops mit westlichen Produkten (z.B. im Deli Barú). In einem Bio-Shop haben wir sogar eine große Packung Müsli gefunden, mit dem wir unser Frühstück mit Früchten zubereitet haben. Früchte und Gemüse gibt es in den kleinen Shops für wenig Geld und diese sind sehr lecker.

Das Klima war ein wenig kühler als in El Copé, da Boquete auch höher gelegen ist. Während des Tages aber sehr angenehm und Nachts braucht man auf jeden Fall etwas Langärmeliges.

Hier kann man eine Menge an Aktivitäten durchführen. Es gibt viele Wanderwege, auch welche die an mehreren Wasserfällen vorbei führen, den Vulkan Barú, den man besteigen kann, heiße Quellen oder den “Sendero Los Quetzales”, welcher eine Wanderroute durch den Dschungel von Bajo Mono nach Cerro Punta ist, von ca. 1000 auf 2000 Meter über dem Meeresspiegel. Ich habe mich dazu entschieden diesen Pfad zu laufen! Zuerst musst du einen Minibus von Boquete nach Bajo Mono nehmen (2$) und von dort kannst du bereits deine Wanderung beginnen. Manche Wanderer präferieren jedoch sich direkt zum Ranger Haus fahren zu lassen, von wo der Pfad “offiziell” beginnt. Frage einfach einen Minibus oder Taxifahrer; diese wissen Bescheid.

DSC00433

Die Aussicht war schon hier beeindruckend und ich hatte sehr viel Glück mit dem Wetter!

DSC00436

On the way to the trail

DSC00465

Boquete Jungle

DSC00490

Auf dem Weg hinauf habe ich zwei Kanadier und einen Israeli getroffen und bin mit ihnen ein Stück mit gelaufen. Nach 3 Stunden oder so wollten diese jedoch umkehren nach Bajo Mono und von dort zum Dorf Boquete, da es zu anstrengend für sie wurde weiter den Pfad entlang aufwärts zu laufen. Es war wirklich ein wenig anstrengend und die hohe Luftfeuchtigkeit hat die Situation nicht verbessert – aber es war eine tolle Wanderung (für diejenigen, die schon Erfahrungen mit dem Wandern gesammelt haben)! Zuerst hat der tropische Regenwald die Landschaft dominiert und je höher ich kam, desto mehr hat sich auch die Vegetation verändert – das Klima wurde trockener und mehr subtropisch.

Boquete Sendero Quetzal

DSC00510

Ich bin also alleine weiter gelaufen und fast im gleichen Moment habe ich zwei andere Kanadier auf dem Weg getroffen. Die beiden waren freaky Weltenbummler-Hippies (oder so etwas Ähnliches ;), einer hat auf dem Weg Gitarre gespielt und der andere eine Art Melodica. Es war witzig etwas gute Musik auf dem Weg mitzubekommen und wirklich ein wenig verrückt :)

DSC00518Als wir am Ende des Weges und am Ranger Haus angelangt sind, waren wir ziemlich erledigt, aber stolz, dass wir es geschafft haben! Bei dem Haus gab es einen schönen Garten mit einer Wiese, vielen Blumen, Eidechsen und Leguanen und Kolibris sind auch herum geflogen und haben den Nektar aus den Blüten getrunken. Wir haben uns hier ausgeruht und ein paar Früchte gegessen.

DSC00515

Ende des Wanderwegs

Später sind wir herunter in Richtung Dorf gelaufen, an landwirtschaftlichen Feldern vorbei und haben weitere schöne Aussichten genossen. Auf dem Weg ist ein Pick-up an uns vorbei gekommen und hat uns hinten drauf bis zur nächsten Bus-Station mit genommen, wo der Bus nach David auch recht schnell kam. Ich bin nach David gefahren (ca. 2 h) und dann wieder eine Stunde hoch nach Boquete.

Es war ein toller Tag mit vielen Abenteuern und als ich das Hostel erreicht habe, war es bereits dunkel!

DSC00519

Ranger Haus

DSC00523

DSC00525

Landschaft um das Dorf Cerro Punta

DSC00529

Hitchhiking zur Bus Station

Boca Brava

Mit dem Bus runter nach David und von dort mit dem Minibus nach Boca Chica. Vor dort mit dem Taxi Boot zur Insel Boca Brava. Die ganze Reise kostete ca. 8$.

DSC00553

Hafen von Boca Chica

Was du auf jeden Fall beachten solltest, wenn du vor hast nach Boca Brava zu reisen, ist genug Geld und vor allem Essen mit zu nehmen – plane ein wenig, wie lange du vor hast auf der Insel zu bleiben, da es keinen Shop, weder ein Restaurant (nur ein teures Hotel Restaurant) noch einen Geldautomaten gibt. Die Insel ist wirklich noch sehr verschlafen.

Es gibt 3 Optionen für Unterkünfte auf der Insel, ein teures Hotel und zwei Hostels die Tipi Zelte, Cabinas oder einfach einen Camping Bereich anbieten, wenn du dein eigenes Zelt dabei hast (Preise zwischen 5 und 30 $). Wir haben uns dazu entschieden im Hostel HowlersBay zu bleiben :)

DSC00564

Insel Blick

Was du hier tun kannst? Zum Strand gehen (es gibt 2), oder einfach nur in der Hängematte relaxen und unwichtige Dinge vergessen!

Von der Veranda aus hat man eine tolle Sicht auf das Meer und andere kleine Inseln! Es ist wirklich sehr schön hier und auch perfekt zum Yoga machen! Die Geräusche vom Urwald sind die ganze Zeit um einen herum, Tagsüber und Nachts.

DSC00569

Weg zum Strand

DSC00625

Boca brava

Fantastische Aussicht

DSC00601

Zeit für die Hängematte :)

The veranda

Die Veranda

DSC00613

IMG_9295

 

IMG_9303

Affen überall

With Thomas at the veranda

Mit Thomas auf der Veranda

playa christina boca brava

Playa Christina

Von Panama über die Grenze nach Costa Rica

Es ist ziemlich einfach; es gibt regelmäßige lokale Busse von David zur Grenze. Dort musst du ein wenig laufen, dir einen Stempel von Panama holen, dass du ausreisen möchtest und einen Stempel von Costa Rica, dass du einreisen möchtest. Manchmal wird man auch nach einem Aus- oder Weiterreise Ticket gefragt. Auch ein Bus-Ticket aus dem Land heraus wird normalerweise akzeptiert. Es kann, je nach Anzahl der Leute, die über die Grenze möchten, kürzer oder länger dauern! In unserem Fall hatten wir Glück und sind sehr schnell durch gekommen. Von der Grenze aus fahren dann viele Busse in verschiedene Gegenden von Costa Rica.

Generelle Sicherheitshinweise

Generell ist es recht sicher in Panama zu reisen. Das war zumindest mein Eindruck. Nichtsdestotrotz gibt es einige Dinge die man beachten sollte und die man sich mit einem gesunden Menschenverstand auch denken kann.

– Laufe nicht alleine bei Nacht (und in manchen Gegenden auch bei Tag, z.B. manche Stadtteile von Panama City und ganz Colón) abgelegene Straßen entlang

teurer und auffälliger Schmuck haben beim Reisen nichts verloren

trage keine sehr kurze Kleidung (Miniröcke etc.), besonders während du im Bus reist

achte auf dein Gepäck (während dem Reisen)

verteile deine Wertsachen an verschiedenen Stellen (Taschen, Gürtel, Gürteltasche, Rucksack, etc.)

Danke fürs Lesen!

-Sarita

! Buch Tipp: Ein tolles Buch, das mich auf meiner Reise durch Panama begleitet hat, ist: Siddhartha von Hermann Hesse ! Es hat wirklich mein Leben bereichert und meine Art zu denken verändert.

Similar posts

NEWS

Traveling, volunteering, connecting with environmental, autonomous and spiritual projects, people and communities and continuously fighting for a better world! Promoting the reconnection with nature, autonomy for our lives, spirituality, indigenous cultures and sacred feminism.

That´s me

Hello, I´m Sarah! Welcome to my blog! I will give you tips and tell stories about responsible traveling, while taking care of our beautiful flora and fauna, and cultures.

Are you happy with my blog?

Are you happy with my posts/travel information and tips? Then I would be in return happy about any donation you can make via the link below :) Thanks!! I am always trying hard to provide you the best and most valuable information I can...but for enhancing my blog and moving straight forward, I do need some tiny resources :)

Get updates - for free!

Just subscribe via E-Mail and never miss the newest travel tips or stories. Just enter your email address here! It´s free :)